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say that in the case of gaza which you mentioned, rob, that was a very series component. any thoughts how to combat that or includes this in the right direction? >> for the record i'm against corruption. [laughter] , good, good, good. >> wanted to clear that up. yes, look. it goes back to the point i thought it made in my remarks that islamists didn't win and non-islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or the divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services. they lose by being so corrupt. they lose by being ossified. they lose, and i islamists are there like they been for eight years to take advantage of whatever opportunity, violence or through nonviolence. we didn't discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence just a very important issue, and they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, to reap the kerry and of these regimes. we can build, we can help them, healthy alternatives build better alternatives. >> we have a question in the far corner over there. >> yes. i'm with the center fo
, the commander in the pentagon, called up rob freeze, who was the owner of globe fire suits said we need 300 fire suits here tomorrow. rob said, what's the sizes? i don't know, figure out how to get them here. rob freeze, the small company in new hampshire of about 300 people assembled fire suits, and rob was the only one allowed to take a mercy flight after 9/11, the only one allowed in the air space, delivered the fire suits, and the firefighters used them to put out the fire in the pentagon. it's a story about patriotism, but it's more than that. i wanted to know, well, what is it that allowed globe fire suits to still have comparative advantages, and one of the biggest insights for globe fire suits came in a production efficiency. they are able to make fire suits much cheaper than a lot of their foreign competitors, and the idea, which i go into detail in the book came from one of the employees on the assembly line who said that if you use a smaller size needle than a larger sized needle, you're actually going to make smaller holes b and it's going to save fabric which saves clothe. it was an
for those of you who know me but rob does, this where is my family began. i'm sure that many in washington know that rob -- they know rob as a defendant analyst of the middle east, an extraordinarily creative executive director of this august organization, but not as many know that rob is a pretty darn good matchmaker. back in 1959-96 i was a fellow as rob mentioned and i married one of the research associates that was was there and we have been have ever since then and i think there's five or six washington institute couples in defying the odds none have resulted in divorce. so you have done an excellent job. >> they call me the sung young moon. >> i was trying to figure out what the other word is for -- but i decided not do it. but for those reasons, both the beginning of my career and i'm forever indebted to rob and his organization. it's also wonderful to have been awarded this terrific -- the gold medal, wreck nix from the institute for my work is truly an honor and, rob, i than to thank martin craner who did an unbelievable job in administering the award. and before i get into the is
] >> rachel cox, who was rob cox? >> a rob rob cox is my deceased uncle, who made that decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him for friends, another man who was a student at harvard and three dartmouth guys who had recently graduated and were intent on doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism. >> so he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life trajectory at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers, had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had property for several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul's school where he distinguished himself as a student and as a student leader and as an athlete and like all his brothers and his uncles and his grandfather before him, he was quite literary. he was a good writer and known as a good writer and when he we
the time to bone up on the people trying to rob us through the x corporation and rob us through the light union and the people getting a subsidy for this and of that. because we think about our ten seconds a year and they think about it all day, everyday so there is only one thing we can do and that is to cut taxes and slice the size of the government. [applause] >> because you know, who knows if they are confidence men. i don't know. i met mitt romney. i liked everything he did. i shook his hand. and i actually grew up and i was born on the south side of chicago where obama claims to come from, born in hyde park. and i saw that whole -- i see everything through that. of course they are confidence men. next question. [laughter] we have a question here. we are reopening the revival of al pacino you have a striking place around the; american capitalism and the is no problem there. there's this great place with nothing to do with his political message but as a great artist who's written do you see yourself evil thing in some way that in some way the way that you articulate your politics and
of power. i'll stop there. >> rob, do you want to kick that went off? >> i have a couple thoughts. this is also connected to another slippery ice pick to the argument. if on the one hand -- if on the one hand people -- islamists it will people of faith, everyone on the other side are liberals. i don't believe i ever use that term in anything i say. the opposite of islamists is not islamists. there's a huge spectrum of people who will run into the streets because they are like the kia network, not at what their life is going to be like under islamists will. they go from radical communists on one hand to western oriented liberals on the other. and indeed, many people of faith, millions of people of faith. five times a day, praying the psalms as opposed to many people who are the ham and cheese eating muslims. they are all fair. i see the natural audience is. it's everyone has a posted a totalitarian agenda of the muslim brotherhood. and due to your. this is where the friendly debate between my partner and i disagree, but a truly free and fair elections where there's a level playing
impossible but the then governor of illinois was mentioned rob flood of which -- the ugly of block a and hit seem to to hem a powerful appointment to which the appointment should make you rich but the plant turned out to have a glitch perhaps the fed said flipped a switch and so much for rob blob of which. in 2012 was a little concerned wonder two candidates were left over to your fans including romney when i did a poem about him yes, he is so slick of speech and garb he reminds us of ken of ken and barbie. quick to shed his regalia he may be lacking genitalia. [laughter] one but we had good candidates for car was concerned there was only one primary in 2008 i had to. we had people like rick perry like john edwards has beautiful hair. and a good time because they say the neath the space beneath the hair is. [inaudible] this book ends with the actual election. since then we have talked like the republicans have lost. i wrote a poem about that called the republican in soul-searching. we're searching our souls and wondering why we got beat so badly our rivals are gloating. is obvious when the c
of our panelists today. we will start with reuel marc gerecht and do to rob and bryan from there have q & a from myself and the audience. the panelists will be allowed two minutes at the tend restate their case and potentially persuade you to believing what they believe. so we'll start with reuel marc gerecht. reuel marc gerecht you may begin. >> [inaudible] i want to thank everybody for coming, and particularly i want to thank my co-panelists here rob and i have been debating this issue for almost a decade. certainly i can say that i don't think i disagreed with him except on this issue. and i particularly have to thank my debating colleague brian katulis from the center of american progress, if does show the left and right can come together on certain issues. and it's particularly brave for him to be with me. on occasion i have looked at the website at sometimes found there depicted as the son of satan. [laughter] i'm not sure what that makes bryan. but i will just say let's just be frank what we're really talking about here is do you dictatorship to democracy? that's what the resolut
'm performing for my first grade teacher again. but it is a great pleasure. this is where, as rob pointed out, my career began. also, those of you who know me, this is where my family began. i am sure that many of you in washington can relate to what is going on in the middle east, rob is a pretty good matchmaker. back in 1995 and 1996, i married one of the research associates that was there during the same year as me as well. we have been happy ever since then. i think it was five or six couples and define the outcome and not have resulted in divorce. you did an excellent job. [laughter] >> anyway, for those reasons, since the beginning of my career, i am forever in debt to rob and his organization. it is also wonderful to have been awarded this terrific gold-medal. the recognition from the institute of my work is truly an honor. i would like to thank rob and mr. martin kramer did a great job demonstrating the lord. before i get into this, i would like to recognize eric trager. he is a fellow penn graduate. it is nice to see someone else from penn in this town doing this kind of work and doi
, and particularly i want to thank michael panelists here. rob satlof and i have been debating this issue for almost a decade. certainly with brett i can say i don't think i've ever disagreed with brett accept on this issue, and i particularly have to thank my colleague, brian katulis at the center for american progress. it shows the left and right can come together on certain issues and it's particularly brave to be here because on occasion i have looked at the web site and i sometimes find they are depicted as the son of satan. so i'm not sure what that makes brian. but i will just say -- let's be frank. what we are talking about is do you prefer dictatorship to democracy because that is what the resolution really is. because we know that if you actually have a free vote, right now the islamists are always going to do well and they are probably going to triumph. that may not be the case down the road. but right now if you have a free vote they will try. certainly in my mind that makes the vote unavoidable in the essential because if you believe you are going to have to go down that path, some have
-year-old girl who tried to rob a convenience store with a loaded gun." that's a real insight to the challenges we have, but just the challenge that anybody has coming here just sort of taking it all in and trying to sort through what's important and what's not. >> that was the strange thing. you mentioned the evangelist murders. at one point, i was just doing a lot of research into detroit history, and i came across this very sensational crime that happened, you know, in the 20s, in this -- it caught my attention because it involved italians, and my parents were here, are, you know, both italian immigrants, and so at that time, this neighborhood -- actually, very close to where the blues concerts are on the east side, was very italian, and there was this guy, called himself benny evangelist. his last anytime was evangelista. he was kind of a cult leader. there was some catholic stuff, but he basically had his own religion and wrote a weird book called small like "the secret history of the universe revealed through a cult science in detroit, michigan." [laughter] which i almos
friedman said, we just don't have the time to bone up on the people who are trying to rob us through the x corporation, the people who are trying to rob us through the y union and the people who are getting a subsidy for this and that because we think about it for ten seconds a year, and they think about it all day every day. so there's only one thing that we can do, and that's to cut taxes and slash the size of the government. [applause] because, you know, who knows, who knows if there are confidence men. i don't know. you know, i met mitt romney. i like him very much. i shook his hand. on the other hand, i actually grew up and was born on the south side of chicago where obama claims to come from and was born in hyde park, and i saw that whole substratum -- i see everything through -- of course, they're all confidence men. next question. [laughter] >> we have a question here. >> [inaudible] ross is reopening a revival with al pacino playing a different role. your great and striking plays are rather cynical about american capitalism, and no great problem this. interestingly, harold pinter,
. >> they were comfortable, yes. >> what inspired rob cox two, six months before, go off to europe? >> well, this is one of the questions that fascinate me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man. i knew that. he went to a school that, a christian school, and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be at more than just yourself, and to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble motivations i think. he was graduated from college. he had no other obvious plan, and yet what we would now call a low draft number. he knew that it was a good chance you'll be drafted drafted into the american army, which had resumed the draft in come at the end of 1940. but had no clear plans to actually go to war, and he wasn't too excited i don't think about spending the next couple of years training for military. so he was casting around for something, and i think this fulfill a lot of meaningful, fulfilled a lot of meaningful goals for him. >> how did he get from harvard to england? i mean, who did he contact? >> that's a
of television. then white house economic adviser gene sperling and republican senator rob portman on deficit reduction and avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. after that we're live with a discussion on the ha tee know vote -- latino vote in the 2012 presidential election and the prospects for changes to immigration policy. and later, the senate's back at 2 p.m. eastern for general speeches. later in the day members resume debate on a bill to temporarily extend the transaction account guarantee or t.a.d. program that provides limited insurance coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts. a procedural vote on the measure is expected at 5:30 eastern. >> host: well, on "the communicators" we're doing a series looking at the future of tv, and this week we're pleased to have joining us the president and ceo of the national cable and telecommunications association, michael powell. mr. powell, thank you for being on "the communicators" again, we appreciate it. >> guest: my pleasure. >> host: if you would, put on your future glasses. >> guest: all right. [laughter] they're on. >> host: loo
. >> for the first time his agenda claims to be robbing the. i really don't think that's going to work. he's not taking from the richest and giving to everybody else. and didn't that and didn't the business secretary give it away? this is what he said about the autumn statement. he said this, what happened was some other donors, very wealthy people stamped their feet. so they scrapped the mansion tax and went ahead with a 15 p. tax cut. mr. speaker, they look after their friends. the people on the christmas card list, and meanwhile, they meet people they never meet and whose lives they will never understand. [shouting] >> his donors put him where he is, pay him every year. but it's perfectly clear, it is perfectly clear, mr. speaker, what the labour party's choice is. their choice is more benefits, paid for by more borrowing. they should listen to the labour trade minister who said this, you know what you call a system of government where what you do is say, oh, we are in trouble, we'll will go and borrow and give it to people. it's called greece. that is whether trade minister said. they
was the source of the of raw material for his silk works? >> it was raw silk from china. it was rob. it came from china and ultimately he would trade and imports from japan. raw silk is like he imported and converted into thread and that was turned into fabric. >> what does it look like? >> here is a silkworm cocoon. the moth is still inside. the manufacturing of silk is very complicated and the extraordinary process. this one a cocoon is wound was one strand of silk half a mile long but it is so fine it is barely perceptible and nowhere near enough shape to be used as the red. in a nutshell, fink of a pyramid and silk cocoons at the bottom the filaments are wound together into a layer and then another layer until you have one thread made of various silk filaments. it is silk that has been unwound from the cocoon and joined together part way up the pyramid that arrives in states in bundles they were called books. >> did they ship textile as well? >> yes. he began to manufacture silk threadfin in holyoke he would weave the thread into fabrics that enabled him to succeed because when he rebuilt the
of the united states, and i'm still cooking. [laughter] >> steve ford, linda johnson rob and jenna and barbara bush on growing up in the white house sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific. it's part of four days of american history right through christmas day on c-span3. >> i think that the idea, and it was promoted in certain articles, and i think there was a conflation of politics because joel, who created the show, is a, is a, you know, a public conservative. i mean, the spectrum of political affiliations on the staff were, you know, from the far left to the far right. but it was no agenda, the idea that there was an agenda which was really the charge that was being forwarded, that we were somehow the midwife to policy on coercive interrogation was absurd, it is absurd. which isn't to say that if there wasn't an issue, if, in fact, our content was affecting the behavior of interrogators in the field, even if it was, you know, .05% of those interrogators actually were taking their cues from jack bauer, there was a systemic problem for sure that i suggested that we, you know, try to inter
summit of the book. for more information, visit loc.gov/international-book -- don't summit. >> who is rob cox? >> he is my deceased uncle who made the decision six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against them and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him porphyrins, another man who was a student at harvard who had recently graduated and they were doing what they could to help the cause. saving their liberties against the forces of market fascism. >> he was studying at harvard at the time. what was his life trajectory at that point? >> he liked his four brothers and they had grown up in new jersey together and vermont where his family had had property for quite a long time. several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul's school, where he was distinguished as a student and a student leader. like all his brothers, they went to harvard. he was a good writer, known as a good writer. and when he went to war, he kept journals and wrote one of the letters
they will think that you will robbed the store. i told my brother i bought a better thing. >>host: you did well for yourself tonight and i appeal of a great holiday and thank you for stopping by hsn. >>caller: thank you yelyou over 40,000 on and we are about halfway through the presentation so if you are channel surfing, thank you for callinstopping by hsn. i hope you had a great afternoon and day but if you are joining as for the first time, this is and this is the finest hour as far as i am concerned.tracy just called and said he got the best. it is a really good thing to have but more importantly he said he had other tap lentoweltablet but you can tell he was not happy with what he got. you want it all. you read the consumer reporting magazines and there is a reason why this is number one. it would not be america's number one selling tablet if they were not doing something right.the no. 1 7 in. selling tabloid in the world and in america. if your channel surfing, i want to go over all the features and i want to pretend you have not seen this all day. to begin lowest price ever at hsn! it is
, it robbed us from hope. yes. you cannot change the behavior of the iranian regime but what you can do is to give the likes -- 7,000 political prisoners who are right now in prison, you can give them hope, because the news does get into the prison, and if they actually hear that you in the united states of america -- and i promise you they will hear this -- you're standing up for them, and not about this whole masquerade of the whole neck tour thing that almost has become a joke. sive they there'd that you would be literally saving those political princers' lives. i have the luxury of not bag politician. i was in a political prison and i saw with my own eyes how thousands of young teenagers were brutally, massacred, after being tortured, and raped under the name of islam and religion. to be honest with you, all i'm interested in is just saving one life. if i can say one life, then i can die in peace. now, i know the arguments here are -- a lot are political, but for me, it is an issue of practicality, and it is an issue of saving lives. >> do you want to jump in? >> give one piece of a
-called fiscal cliff by white house economic adviser gene sperling and republican senator rob portman. then we're live with a discussion on the latino vote in the 2012 presidential election and the prospects for changes to immigration policy. and later the senate's back at 2 p.m. eastern for general speeches. later, members resume debate on extending the transaction account guarantee or t.a.g. program that provides unlimited deposit insurance cover coverage a procedural vote on that measure is expected along with a vote on president obama's nominee to be the assistant secretary of housing and urban development. live gavel-to-gavel coverage here on c-span2. >> today the pew center ohses a daylong conference on voters' experiences in the 2012 election. representatives from google, facebook, microsoft and twitter as well as democratic and gop secretaries of state will discuss voter registration and id laws and the long lines that occurred outside some voting precincts. live coverage of the conference begins at 9 a.m. eastern over on c-span3. >> now, white house economic adviser gene sperling and
ourselves from being robbed and murdered, raped, salon? we need firearms to defend ourselves and they have certainly been playing on that for many years. >> host: but as the crime is rising and crack cocaine and the games and the sophisticated guns, the congress acted again. only the third time they acted to gun control. with a the brady bill and the assault weapon ban. how does that fit in? >> guest: well, you had the attempted assassination of president ronald reagan. it took him ten years to come around to supporting a stronger. he did of course in the brady bill, and he wrote an op-ed in "the new york times" which insure everybody has forgotten about but it's in the book saying we need some kind of measure like the one i signed when i was governor of california that makes people go through a waiting period before they can acquire a handgun and i think the assault weapons ban which came out a little later was more emotional than that. if you look at the violent crime committed with guns in our cities today, these assault weapons that look like the m-16 or the ak-47 didn't figure in thos
. in the murder of mexicans upon their own sorrow or robbing them of their country, i can take apart either now or hereafter. and he was rather strong in his opinions, but that was the kind of critique the ec certainly by march of 1847 when the united states bombarded the town of veracruz bidding to the deaths of a lot of civilians. and anti american critique. the second grounds were slavery and giddings was an abolitionist , but it was not just abolitionists are people in new england in tucson issues of slavery be really important. it would make slavery sprayed and make the slave power stronger again, it was not just people in newfoundland. consider for a moment this very popular print. maybe some of you have seen this. it's kind of a neat image of the power of newspapers. this was called the news from mexico. sort of a well-known and respected artist at the time. first it looks like an image of people being enthusiastic about the war. had just gone news in the newspapers. in fact with a u.s.-mexico war was the first war were journalists traveled and were embedded with troops. this is the firs
to rob a suburban convenience store with a loaded gun. >> that is the challenge we have, the challenge anybody has coming here, taking a call in and trying to sort of threw what is important. >> that was a strange thing. you mentioned the evangelist murders and that was tied to a person. at one point i was doing research into a deflationary history and came across a sensational crime that happened in the 20s. it caught my attention because it involved battalions and my parents were here, both italian immigrants and at that time this neighborhood, actually very close to what the east side, was very italian and this guy called themselves benny evangelist and he was a cult leader. sort of there was some catholic stuff in his called but he basically made up his own religion and this really weird book called something like the secret history of the universe as revealed through occult science in detroit, michigan. i almost used that for my title. he ended up he and his entire family were brutally gruesomely murdered. they were be headed, his children were killed as well, and it was a big sen
to little more than cool categorizations especially if israelis. labels that she says ken rob the smart, savvy and lively people which she came to know in their decency and humanity. all of these things provide little if any feel for the actual israeli way of life and it is that of all things i hope to portray in these pages. let me say at the outset that i think that lela has fulfilled this in particular in portraying the israeli people and their way of life. and that is important because i think she is right about what the world knows about israel -- israel through the various issues he enumerated, above all for an foreign piece. i suppose i should say, this is the way people mostly know other countries, mostly from afar, and mostly through what journalists write about and what we occasionally see on tv. we don't have an intimate sense of what people are like there are. the question would be, what's different about israel? i think there is a difference in the difference is israel is so frequently in the news and so much in terms of the issues that people think they really do know this
anything about it, how are we going to keep ourselves from being robbed, murdered and so on. when he firearms in the nra has been playing on that line for many years. >> guest: is crime is rising in the 80s and early 90s, crack and more sophisticated god, congress acted again. really only the third time they reacted. the brady bill and the assault weapon ban. how does that fit into the chronology? >> guest: well, you had the attempted assassination of president reagan. took in 10 years to come around to supporting a stronger measure. he eventually did of course, the brady bill. he wrote an op-ed in "the new york times," which i'm sure everybody in the nra has forgotten about, but i talk about this in the book, saying we need some kind of like the one i signed up as governor of california that makes people go through waiting period before they can acquire handguns. and i think the assault weapons ban, which came out later was more emotional than brielle. if you look at violent crimes committed with guns in our cities today or then, these assault weapons that look like m-16s or ak-47s
that this is a way of robbing women of agency and individuality, using them to object or commodities. i have written several articles on this subject myself and the latest one was about the pornographic abuse of women on the internet. what about the degrading prison of plastic surgery's. nicolas sarkozy calls the burqa a degrading prison, what about plastic surgery? agreed, and dress in the locker room of my jaw my see women bearing the scars of mike reception, to me, breast implants and some no doubt undertaken out of personal choice but i think a lot undertaken also by the pressure of the gender culture to conform to a male norm of female beauty that casts women as sex objects. of the proposal were to ban all practices concerning which the ministry of feminism concluded day objectify women the proposal would at least be consistent, although few including few feminists would endorse such a sweeping restriction of liberty where the authorities would have a small number of alleged feminist experts. but it is not consistent. proponents of the burqa ban did not propose to ban all these objectifying pra
that corruption robbed the service of. we saw this in the floodses, the earthquake, come in with medical aide quickly, tents quickly while the state is twid ling its thumbs on a foreign trip to france. i -- u -- you know, i think as a young country, it's only 63 years old. when this country was 63 years old, you know -- >> still ready for the civil war. >> getting ready for the civil war so i think there is -- and an incredible amount of space for hope, for pakistan. >> good, well, the fact you are still living there is an element of that. let's take questions from the audience. starting here in the lowest reaches. wait for the microphone, brief, ask the question, if there's a paper to read a speech, put it down. [laughter] >> this is just a paper handed to me. during your reading and during your speech, it's clear that, first of all, a pleasure listening to you. >> thank you. >> it was clear that i just want to let you know we don't like him either. [laughter] more importantly, my question is, you know, after he, there's another, and we have not touched upon that, perhaps, you can spend a ha
to keep ourselves from being robbed, murdered, rained, and so on? we need firearms to defend ourselves, and the nra certainly has been playing on that line for many years. >> host: but as crime was rising in the 80s and early 1990s, crack cocaine and the gangs and more sophisticated guns, congress acted again. i mean, really only the third time they acted to do gun control measures. >> guest: with the -- >> host: the brady bill and assault weapon ban. how does that fit into the cronology then? >> guest: well, you had the attempted assassination of president reagan. took him ten years to come around to supporting a stronger measure. he eventually did, of course, the brady bill, and he wrote an op-ed in the "new york times," which i'm sure everybody in the nra forgot about, but i dug it up, and it's in the book saying that, you know, if we need some kind of measure like the one i signed when i was governor of california that makes people go through a waiting period before they can acquire handguns, and i think the assault weapons ban, which came out a little later -- >> host: the next ye
can recognize him. that's definitely him. this is a man named rob lowe. i'm sorry, that is kono. the fact that you could get close to the rebellion i think was very exciting. one thing i didn't mention is that six days after the amistad african came to shore in new london connecticut, play was being reformed in new york about their appraising. it only took six days and it was a hit. it was a hit in a theater that had a very large working-class audience, a black-and-white audience at the bowery theater. it was estimated thousands of people saw that plan they learned about the rebellion that way and he was a hero. all of the things are kind of counterintuitive, aren't they? that is part of why this project was so surprising. they did not expect to see this level of not only popular interest but a sympathy. a lot of people went to jail saying i hate the abolitionist but i really support those africans. those abolitionists are dangerous extremist but we support these people. we want those people to be free so it's interesting it expands the idea of anti-slavery the abolitionist. yes
with the microphone. >> thank you. rob, aic investments a manufacturing investor in 20 states and my question goes to innovation funds which you brought up. at what stage are you focusing on? with respect to expansion or startups? on an execution basis, what's the plan as far as national strategies? >> those of us in the government job, you you know where you want to be like like the classic economic book is look for where we are under investing as a country or where we have too little capital as a country going to the private sector enterprises where because individual actors do not feel they get the full benefits but we, as a country, would be richer and if there was more investments in those areas and so one of the things we're trying to look at, i think the expressions are where are the valley of deaths? meaning, where are the places where in the innovative process for companies where they are not able to get the capital they need to be, perhaps, one of the gazelles the fast growing companies and i think the hard part at t
someone a newspaper, you're close enough to rob them as well. from the course of, over the course of history, cities have been battling with the demons of density; crime, contagious disease, congestion. this is a map a of death rates in new york from 1800 to today. a boy born in new york city could expect to live seven years less than the national average, today life expectancies are three years longer. we don't understand fully why cities like boston and new york are healthier than denser areas. some people credit walking, more people credit social connection. among younger people, though, it's crystal clear. two big causes for the death, motor vehicle accidents and suicide, both much rarer. it's a lot safer to get on the t after a few drinks than it is to get behind the wheel of a car. not that i'm recommending anything. [laughter] maybe suicide rates also reflect social connection or the influence of gun culture where there's a strong existence. now, this didn't happen by accident. america's cities and towns only became safe through massive expenditures on water works, right? a
if you can catch it on your phone. also a mentor on "american idol." the final person out there is rob friedman. [applause] , now. he's the cochairman of lions gate and producer of governor schwarzenegger's latest. but a long career in the industry was chief operating is very paramount and created summit entertainment, which they are created the groundbreaking pilot series. he's also very active and he doesn't still have them. so without further ado, thank you so much for coming. we will get rolling. [applause] the topic of the panel is innovation in the entertainment industry is sometimes seen not just as a source of innovation in the digital revolution, but also to the tom and the great successes with one of the top stories of industry peer grapevines that the figure in things like out. when being hit by kids at thy sons and hits on youtube. after this to you first activate studio. >> first of all, anyone who's buying our product, we are a content provider. so anybody who's licensing, buying our product as a friend. any of the new innovations works to our advantage. the important par
a mentor on "american idol." the final person is rob friedman. come on now. [applause] he's the cochairman of lions gate and producer of governor schwarzenegger's latest. but a long career in industry, chief operating officer of paramount and created some entertainment, where he created the twilight series. he's also very, very good in the special olympics movement with a pile of folders from the special olympics coordinating. without further ado, thank you so much for coming. we will get rolling. [applause] the topic of the panelists innovation they think the entertainment industry at this moment is sometimes seen not just as a source of innovation, it's in the way filmmaking change the resolution but also sometimes the bad and i think there's a studio system has great success as one of the big top-down story sometimes it industries. grapevines like the figuring things out any moment when the media environment is disrupted by kids that buy phones for u2. i will throw this on to you first cannot you navigate the transformation. >> first of all, anyone who's buying our product, anyone who's
africa was a nice collection of mrs. booker rob continue to carry at attacks in nigeria from exporting agreements in northern nature as to when recruits and public sympathy. the number and sophistication is increasing and while the group focuses on nigerian issues that are scum at every port is developing financial with other extremists and rushes to operate on a bigger stage. at this point i need to make something of a detour because while nonstate actors such as al qaeda remain at the top of our prior to this, witnessed resurgence of state sponsorship of terrorism as well, session in a dangerous and destabilizing activities of the iranian regime, which it is done through the iranian revolutionary guard -- iranian revolutionary guard corps is in tehran's ally, hezbollah. in addition to the critical support the quds force has provided for the assad regime over the past year has been iranian backed terrorism. in fact hezbollah's activities reached a tempo unseat since the 1990s of the tax funded in southeast asia, europe and africa and it appears the group has carried out an attack abou
you. rob, invest in state we're in manufacturing invested in 20 states. my question goes to innovation funds which you brought it. at which stage are you focusing on? is it with respect to either extension or the startups? then on an execution basis, which the regional plan as far as international strategy? >> well look, i think it's for those of us who in the government job, would you want to be a bit like the classic economic look, is you want to look for where we're under investing as a country, or were we have too little capital as a country going to private sector, where because individual private actors do not feel they get the full benefit from those investments. but we as a country would be richer if there was more investment in those areas. and so i think one of the things that we are trying to look at is, i think the expressions become, where are the valley of death? mean, where are those places where in the innovative process for companies, where they are not able to get the capital they need, perhaps one of the gazelles, one of the fast-growing companies. and i think the ha
would throw economy back into a deep recession, there would be nothing that would rob more americans and hurt our most vulnerable citizens more than being -- having their house go back underwater because of a rise in interest rates, or that potential of a job disappear because an employer decides to end up no longer active, or that unemployment benefits don't get extended because we chose to punt rather than deal with this issue. and, again, we go over a cliff, and if the chances are only 10% that this throws us back into a deep recession, unlike in the past, unlike the fiscal crisis of 2008, we don't have extraordinary measures of stimulus or the fed being able to dramatically lower interest rates. so i believe, mr. president, that we do need balanced, responsible, at least $4 trillion deal. a deal, again, that i believe counts the cuts we've already made, that adds additional real revenue. and again, as i mentioned earlier, i think the president has started too low in terms of the amount of revenue we need. we took $4.5 trillion out of the revenue stream over the last ten years. i
robbing peter to pay paul. we need americans to help the victims of hurricane sandy rebuild their lives. we also don't do it by eliminating programs that are critical to our economy and especially programs critical to our national security. this amendment includes a new provision that would prevent all funds within this act from being considered emergency spending. now, mr. president, can any one of us stand here on this floor in a straight face and say that the devastating effects of the largest atlantic hurricane in history isn't an emergency? the presiding officer: if the senator would suspend, the time for the vote has now arrived. mr. leahy: i would ask consent for two more minutes. ms. mikulski: i'm right here. mr. leahy: are you ready to vote? i will take 30 seconds. ms. mikulski: i ask unanimous consent that the gentleman be allowed to finish his statement. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. leahy: when they say it's not an emergency, look what happened in this hurricane. we lost 120 american lives. we lost 340,000 homes. we lost 200,000 businesses with sandy. if that
to solve our fiscal issues so they aren't saddled with debt and robbed of their opportunity for the american dream, and seniors expect us to honor the commitments that we have made to them. if we act now, we will be addressing the debt ceiling more than three months before we reach it. let me walk through those changes that are well known to policymakers in congress and the administration, and i will begin with medicare. medicare's trust fund has $27 trillion in unfunded liabilities and is expected to be insolvent by the year 2024. according to an urban institute study, an average income, married family will contribute about $119,000 in payroll taxes to medicare in today's dollars over their lifetime and consume about $357,000 in today's dollars in medicare benefits. obviously, this is unsustainable. everybody in this room knows this. the pages in front of me know that. medicare needs to be structured in a way to provide care for current and future beneficiaries in a fiscally responsible manner. this bill would structurally transform medicare, keeping fee-for-service medicar
will be even worse. the forest service budget, when you have bad fire years, they have to rob from other accounts. that was the case this year with a shortfall of $653 million. this amendment closes that gap and gives the forest service the resources for the next upcoming fire season, which is due to be a bad one. this also -- the amendment also includes -- requires the g.a.o. to recommend new models to better reflect the costs associated with wildland fires because they've been underfunded so much in the past. this will establish a better model and reduce the need for supplemental funding in this account in the future. here's the scoop, folks. the damage done by fires particularly in the west was -- was extensive and is an emergency. they can continue the forest service can continue to rob money from other accounts to fight these fires which ends up in poor forest management and even bigger fires. i would encourage your concurrence with this amendment. thank you madam chair. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: to yields time? the senator from alabama. mr. sessions: madam
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